16th September, 2014

Pittsburg [Kansas]’s first librarian, Ella Buchanan, left her post more than 100 years ago to pursue her dream of becoming an artist.

She achieved it and then some: One of her sculptures became the face of the women’s suffrage movement; another was a gift to a U.S. president.

Now, a bit of Buchanan, including one of her sculptures, is back in the library and will remain there permanently thanks to a gift from her family, an anonymous benefactor, a local craftsman and some sleuthing by Bev Clarkson, Pittsburg library director.

— ”Pittsburg’s first librarian became noted artist; sculpture, portrait to be put on permanent display" by Andra Bryan Stefanoni in the Joplin Globe, with another hat tip to AL Direct for the link

9th September, 2014

hclib:

Excelsior Library Returns to Water Street
Above is a photo of Excelsior Library in 1938.  The Women’s Club of Lake Minnetonka formed the first free public library in Excelsior in 1922.  With assistance from the newly formed Hennepin County Library, they converted the former White House Hotel into the Excelsior Branch of Hennepin County Library.
Isabel Wells Bladen was the first librarian and was replaced by Mary Kayhill Bardwell later in 1922. In 1928 the library moved to the third floor of the Masonic Temple on Water Street.  The 3 flight hike to the library wasn’t popular so the library moved again in 1932 to a room in the Charles Sampson block on the southwest corner of Second and Water Streets.  The new location featured, “…bright new linoleum rugs, several reading tables, added shelf room and lighting fixtures. The room is comfortably heated…The windows are daintily curtained and growing plants give the room a homey appearance. Mrs. Bardwell takes pride in making her library patrons feel at home.”(Excelsior Record, September 9, 1932).
Mrs. Bardwell was succeeded by Margaret Cutler in 1934.  Lelia T. Bitting was the librarian from 1943-1963.  In 1946 the library was moved to the Village Hall, which stood in the same location as its most recent building, which it occupied from February 1966-August 2014.
Other Excelsior Librarians:
Fern Michael 1963-1968
David Waldemar 1965-1969
Roger Burg 1969-1972
Kay Nowak 1972-1973
Rita Strand 1973-1975
Fred Neighbors 1976
Cathy Dahl Fischer 1976-1986
Virginia Hastings 1986-1990
Paul Turgeon 1990-1995
Peggy Bauer 1993-present
Now a new chapter starts for Excelsior Library.  It returns to Water Street with a grand opening this Saturday, September 13, 2014, at 9 a.m. Please join us for the celebration.
If you stop and and visit, please share your favorite things on social media about the new Excelsior Library with one of these hashtags: #BackToWaterSt or #ExcelsiorLibrary

hclib:

Excelsior Library Returns to Water Street

Above is a photo of Excelsior Library in 1938.  The Women’s Club of Lake Minnetonka formed the first free public library in Excelsior in 1922.  With assistance from the newly formed Hennepin County Library, they converted the former White House Hotel into the Excelsior Branch of Hennepin County Library.

Isabel Wells Bladen was the first librarian and was replaced by Mary Kayhill Bardwell later in 1922. In 1928 the library moved to the third floor of the Masonic Temple on Water Street.  The 3 flight hike to the library wasn’t popular so the library moved again in 1932 to a room in the Charles Sampson block on the southwest corner of Second and Water Streets.  The new location featured, “…bright new linoleum rugs, several reading tables, added shelf room and lighting fixtures. The room is comfortably heated…The windows are daintily curtained and growing plants give the room a homey appearance. Mrs. Bardwell takes pride in making her library patrons feel at home.”(Excelsior Record, September 9, 1932).

Mrs. Bardwell was succeeded by Margaret Cutler in 1934.  Lelia T. Bitting was the librarian from 1943-1963.  In 1946 the library was moved to the Village Hall, which stood in the same location as its most recent building, which it occupied from February 1966-August 2014.

Other Excelsior Librarians:

Fern Michael 1963-1968

David Waldemar 1965-1969

Roger Burg 1969-1972

Kay Nowak 1972-1973

Rita Strand 1973-1975

Fred Neighbors 1976

Cathy Dahl Fischer 1976-1986

Virginia Hastings 1986-1990

Paul Turgeon 1990-1995

Peggy Bauer 1993-present

Now a new chapter starts for Excelsior Library.  It returns to Water Street with a grand opening this Saturday, September 13, 2014, at 9 a.m. Please join us for the celebration.

If you stop and and visit, please share your favorite things on social media about the new Excelsior Library with one of these hashtags: #BackToWaterSt or #ExcelsiorLibrary

28th August, 2014

“So I say to Miss Ahern, as she lays down her editorial pen: Your periodical has been an inspiration to literally thousands of workers in the library field; some mere beginners but also to many others who have grown old in professional library service. You have always stood for the highest ideals; you have constantly championed what seemed the right course, even though it might not be the popular one toward which the crowd seemed to be hurrying. You have invariably stood for full and free discussion of every mooted question and have claimed the right to look at it from various angles. You have refused to accept obiter dicta without rigid scrutiny. You have been fearless in the championship of what you thought to be the right. You never courted favor at the expense of your convictions.”

Theodore W. Koch,  librarian, Northwestern University Library. Libraries, Vol. 36, No. 10, Dec. 1931. pp 436-7. From the University of Illinois Library.

Read more about Mary Eileen Ahern at the ALA Archives blog at the University of Illinois archives.

(I found this blog post after reading their post about the Knapp School Libraries Project. Longtime WoLH readers will remember that our very first post, written by Peggy Sullivan herself, was about the Knapp School Libraries Project.)

22nd August, 2014

1st August, 2014

18th July, 2014

Horn left Russia with her family when she was 8 — “maybe because I immigrated, I took very seriously what the Constitution said,” she muses — and started working at libraries in 1942. In January 1971, she was the chief reference librarian at Bucknell University in sleepy Lewisburg, Pa., when two FBI agents showed up unexpectedly at her home.

They asked her to answer some questions and look at photos. When she refused, she was handed a grand jury subpoena.

FBI snooping has librarians stamping mad / Local woman jailed in ’70s in informant flap,” a San Francisco Chronicle article about Zoia Horn.

Horn, who was 96, died on Saturday. (Hat tip to AL Direct, which linked to this obituary notice from OIF. Check it out for links to more information about Zoia Horn.)

6th May, 2014

rrlc1966:

"Card Filer’s Freakout"  - Martha Trezpacz seated at her desk in the act of throwing catalog cards at the offices of the Capital District Library Council at Union College,Schenectady, New York.
We all have those days. 
Capital District Library Council

Does anyone know more about Martha Trezpacz? I can only find a few more images of her from the New York Heritage Digital Library.

rrlc1966:

"Card Filer’s Freakout"  - Martha Trezpacz seated at her desk in the act of throwing catalog cards at the offices of the Capital District Library Council at Union College,SchenectadyNew York.

We all have those days. 

Capital District Library Council

Does anyone know more about Martha Trezpacz? I can only find a few more images of her from the New York Heritage Digital Library.

2nd May, 2014

iowawomensarchives:

Collect them all!!

In 1978, Lois Rich was asked by her 8-year-old daughter, a baseball card collector, why there weren’t any pictures of girls on the cards. By the following year, Rich had sought out and received grant funding from educational organizations to create the Supersisters trading card set, featuring 72 feminist heroines [source]. With subjects ranging from puppeteer Shari Lewis to politician and future IWA co-founder Mary Louise Smith, the cards have been dismissed by some modern-day pundits as a “noble but misguided” project (“It’s sort of hard to imagine kids getting excited about them — ‘Hey, I’ll trade you two Bella Abzugs for a mint Shirley Chisolm!’”). However, I find them a fascinating artifact documenting the areas in which women were — and weren’t — making progress during the second wave of feminism. 
— former IWA assistant and current archivist supersister Sarah Dorpinghaus

Iowa Digital Library: Supersisters trading cards, 1979
Iowa Women’s Archives: Guide to the Mary Louise Smith papers, 1925-1997
View all Women’s History Wednesday posts

So this isn’t library history specifically, but I still think it’s rad. iowawomensarchives:

Collect them all!!

In 1978, Lois Rich was asked by her 8-year-old daughter, a baseball card collector, why there weren’t any pictures of girls on the cards. By the following year, Rich had sought out and received grant funding from educational organizations to create the Supersisters trading card set, featuring 72 feminist heroines [source]. With subjects ranging from puppeteer Shari Lewis to politician and future IWA co-founder Mary Louise Smith, the cards have been dismissed by some modern-day pundits as a “noble but misguided” project (“It’s sort of hard to imagine kids getting excited about them — ‘Hey, I’ll trade you two Bella Abzugs for a mint Shirley Chisolm!’”). However, I find them a fascinating artifact documenting the areas in which women were — and weren’t — making progress during the second wave of feminism. 
— former IWA assistant and current archivist supersister Sarah Dorpinghaus

Iowa Digital Library: Supersisters trading cards, 1979
Iowa Women’s Archives: Guide to the Mary Louise Smith papers, 1925-1997
View all Women’s History Wednesday posts

So this isn’t library history specifically, but I still think it’s rad. iowawomensarchives:

Collect them all!!

In 1978, Lois Rich was asked by her 8-year-old daughter, a baseball card collector, why there weren’t any pictures of girls on the cards. By the following year, Rich had sought out and received grant funding from educational organizations to create the Supersisters trading card set, featuring 72 feminist heroines [source]. With subjects ranging from puppeteer Shari Lewis to politician and future IWA co-founder Mary Louise Smith, the cards have been dismissed by some modern-day pundits as a “noble but misguided” project (“It’s sort of hard to imagine kids getting excited about them — ‘Hey, I’ll trade you two Bella Abzugs for a mint Shirley Chisolm!’”). However, I find them a fascinating artifact documenting the areas in which women were — and weren’t — making progress during the second wave of feminism. 
— former IWA assistant and current archivist supersister Sarah Dorpinghaus

Iowa Digital Library: Supersisters trading cards, 1979
Iowa Women’s Archives: Guide to the Mary Louise Smith papers, 1925-1997
View all Women’s History Wednesday posts

So this isn’t library history specifically, but I still think it’s rad. iowawomensarchives:

Collect them all!!

In 1978, Lois Rich was asked by her 8-year-old daughter, a baseball card collector, why there weren’t any pictures of girls on the cards. By the following year, Rich had sought out and received grant funding from educational organizations to create the Supersisters trading card set, featuring 72 feminist heroines [source]. With subjects ranging from puppeteer Shari Lewis to politician and future IWA co-founder Mary Louise Smith, the cards have been dismissed by some modern-day pundits as a “noble but misguided” project (“It’s sort of hard to imagine kids getting excited about them — ‘Hey, I’ll trade you two Bella Abzugs for a mint Shirley Chisolm!’”). However, I find them a fascinating artifact documenting the areas in which women were — and weren’t — making progress during the second wave of feminism. 
— former IWA assistant and current archivist supersister Sarah Dorpinghaus

Iowa Digital Library: Supersisters trading cards, 1979
Iowa Women’s Archives: Guide to the Mary Louise Smith papers, 1925-1997
View all Women’s History Wednesday posts

So this isn’t library history specifically, but I still think it’s rad. iowawomensarchives:

Collect them all!!

In 1978, Lois Rich was asked by her 8-year-old daughter, a baseball card collector, why there weren’t any pictures of girls on the cards. By the following year, Rich had sought out and received grant funding from educational organizations to create the Supersisters trading card set, featuring 72 feminist heroines [source]. With subjects ranging from puppeteer Shari Lewis to politician and future IWA co-founder Mary Louise Smith, the cards have been dismissed by some modern-day pundits as a “noble but misguided” project (“It’s sort of hard to imagine kids getting excited about them — ‘Hey, I’ll trade you two Bella Abzugs for a mint Shirley Chisolm!’”). However, I find them a fascinating artifact documenting the areas in which women were — and weren’t — making progress during the second wave of feminism. 
— former IWA assistant and current archivist supersister Sarah Dorpinghaus

Iowa Digital Library: Supersisters trading cards, 1979
Iowa Women’s Archives: Guide to the Mary Louise Smith papers, 1925-1997
View all Women’s History Wednesday posts

So this isn’t library history specifically, but I still think it’s rad. iowawomensarchives:

Collect them all!!

In 1978, Lois Rich was asked by her 8-year-old daughter, a baseball card collector, why there weren’t any pictures of girls on the cards. By the following year, Rich had sought out and received grant funding from educational organizations to create the Supersisters trading card set, featuring 72 feminist heroines [source]. With subjects ranging from puppeteer Shari Lewis to politician and future IWA co-founder Mary Louise Smith, the cards have been dismissed by some modern-day pundits as a “noble but misguided” project (“It’s sort of hard to imagine kids getting excited about them — ‘Hey, I’ll trade you two Bella Abzugs for a mint Shirley Chisolm!’”). However, I find them a fascinating artifact documenting the areas in which women were — and weren’t — making progress during the second wave of feminism. 
— former IWA assistant and current archivist supersister Sarah Dorpinghaus

Iowa Digital Library: Supersisters trading cards, 1979
Iowa Women’s Archives: Guide to the Mary Louise Smith papers, 1925-1997
View all Women’s History Wednesday posts

So this isn’t library history specifically, but I still think it’s rad. iowawomensarchives:

Collect them all!!

In 1978, Lois Rich was asked by her 8-year-old daughter, a baseball card collector, why there weren’t any pictures of girls on the cards. By the following year, Rich had sought out and received grant funding from educational organizations to create the Supersisters trading card set, featuring 72 feminist heroines [source]. With subjects ranging from puppeteer Shari Lewis to politician and future IWA co-founder Mary Louise Smith, the cards have been dismissed by some modern-day pundits as a “noble but misguided” project (“It’s sort of hard to imagine kids getting excited about them — ‘Hey, I’ll trade you two Bella Abzugs for a mint Shirley Chisolm!’”). However, I find them a fascinating artifact documenting the areas in which women were — and weren’t — making progress during the second wave of feminism. 
— former IWA assistant and current archivist supersister Sarah Dorpinghaus

Iowa Digital Library: Supersisters trading cards, 1979
Iowa Women’s Archives: Guide to the Mary Louise Smith papers, 1925-1997
View all Women’s History Wednesday posts

So this isn’t library history specifically, but I still think it’s rad. iowawomensarchives:

Collect them all!!

In 1978, Lois Rich was asked by her 8-year-old daughter, a baseball card collector, why there weren’t any pictures of girls on the cards. By the following year, Rich had sought out and received grant funding from educational organizations to create the Supersisters trading card set, featuring 72 feminist heroines [source]. With subjects ranging from puppeteer Shari Lewis to politician and future IWA co-founder Mary Louise Smith, the cards have been dismissed by some modern-day pundits as a “noble but misguided” project (“It’s sort of hard to imagine kids getting excited about them — ‘Hey, I’ll trade you two Bella Abzugs for a mint Shirley Chisolm!’”). However, I find them a fascinating artifact documenting the areas in which women were — and weren’t — making progress during the second wave of feminism. 
— former IWA assistant and current archivist supersister Sarah Dorpinghaus

Iowa Digital Library: Supersisters trading cards, 1979
Iowa Women’s Archives: Guide to the Mary Louise Smith papers, 1925-1997
View all Women’s History Wednesday posts

So this isn’t library history specifically, but I still think it’s rad. iowawomensarchives:

Collect them all!!

In 1978, Lois Rich was asked by her 8-year-old daughter, a baseball card collector, why there weren’t any pictures of girls on the cards. By the following year, Rich had sought out and received grant funding from educational organizations to create the Supersisters trading card set, featuring 72 feminist heroines [source]. With subjects ranging from puppeteer Shari Lewis to politician and future IWA co-founder Mary Louise Smith, the cards have been dismissed by some modern-day pundits as a “noble but misguided” project (“It’s sort of hard to imagine kids getting excited about them — ‘Hey, I’ll trade you two Bella Abzugs for a mint Shirley Chisolm!’”). However, I find them a fascinating artifact documenting the areas in which women were — and weren’t — making progress during the second wave of feminism. 
— former IWA assistant and current archivist supersister Sarah Dorpinghaus

Iowa Digital Library: Supersisters trading cards, 1979
Iowa Women’s Archives: Guide to the Mary Louise Smith papers, 1925-1997
View all Women’s History Wednesday posts

So this isn’t library history specifically, but I still think it’s rad.

iowawomensarchives:

Collect them all!!

In 1978, Lois Rich was asked by her 8-year-old daughter, a baseball card collector, why there weren’t any pictures of girls on the cards. By the following year, Rich had sought out and received grant funding from educational organizations to create the Supersisters trading card set, featuring 72 feminist heroines [source]. With subjects ranging from puppeteer Shari Lewis to politician and future IWA co-founder Mary Louise Smith, the cards have been dismissed by some modern-day pundits as a “noble but misguided” project (“It’s sort of hard to imagine kids getting excited about them — ‘Hey, I’ll trade you two Bella Abzugs for a mint Shirley Chisolm!’”). However, I find them a fascinating artifact documenting the areas in which women were — and weren’t — making progress during the second wave of feminism. 

 former IWA assistant and current archivist supersister Sarah Dorpinghaus

Iowa Digital Library: Supersisters trading cards, 1979

Iowa Women’s Archives: Guide to the Mary Louise Smith papers, 1925-1997

View all Women’s History Wednesday posts

So this isn’t library history specifically, but I still think it’s rad.

1st April, 2014

Women’s History Month is over

It’s April! While I’m excited to see spring finally beginning to arrive, I’m sad to see the end of Women’s History Month.

Women of Library History won’t be totally disappearing, but we will be scaling back for the rest of the year. I’ve posted almost all the submissions we received for 2014, so I’m only planning to post once or twice a month for the rest of the year.

I’ll keep an eye on the Tumblr tag women of library history; tag us if you’re posting something that fits with our mission! I’ll be keeping an eye out for things to reblog. You can also send messages through our Tumblr ask box or, as always, e-mail womenoflibraryhistory@gmail.com

(A belated welcome to everyone who found us through Tumblr Tuesdays or American Libraries! I hope you’ll take some time to look through our archives. Here’s the index of 2013’s posts; I’ll update it with 2014 posts soon.)

31st March, 2014

Lily Lawrence Bow

Katherine Fleming submitted today’s post.

Lily Lawrence Bow was the first librarian in Homestead.  Since the city had no position for a librarian, Bow was appointed as a policeman.

Bow was recognized by the Great Floridians 2000 program:

Lily Lawrence Bow was born in 1870, came to Florida with her husband Richard in 1900 and later to Homestead with her two children where she settled in a log cabin on the corner of 2nd Avenue and Avocado Drive. She sold citrus and raised chickens. In 1920 the Women’s Club of Homestead appointed her chair of their library committee, which soon became a public library. Book donations came from Dade County and Lily Bow gave books to local schools. The library outgrew its home in the Women’s Club and moved to a city-owned site. With the help of land donations and the W.P.A., a permanent library was built in 1939. It was named the Lily Lawrence Bow Library. Lily Lawrence Bow died in 1943.

Built of coral rock and hand-hewn Dade County pine, the library was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on August 5, 1996.